Vegan Baking 101: Delicious Tips!

Vegan baking 101 can be a bit trickier than traditional baking, but it’s definitely possible to make delicious and beautiful desserts without the use of any animal products. In this post, we’ll go over some common substitutions for ingredients like eggs and butter, as well as provide some recipe ideas for vegan cakes, cookies, and more.

First, let’s talk about substitutions. Eggs are often used in baking as a binder and to provide moisture, but there are several options that can be used in place of them. Some popular egg substitutes in vegan baking include:

-Applesauce: This can be used in a 1:1 ratio with eggs. It will add moisture and a subtle sweetness to your baked goods.

-Mashed bananas: This works well in recipes that call for a small number of eggs, like cookies.

-Aquafaba: This is the liquid from a can of chickpeas, and it can be whipped into a meringue-like consistency to use in recipes that call for beaten eggs.

-Flax eggs: Mix 1 tablespoon of ground flaxseed with 3 tablespoons of water, let sit for a few minutes to thicken, then use in place of one egg.

-Silken Tofu: You can blend silken tofu and use it in place of eggs in recipes for cakes, cupcakes, and other desserts.

*Vegan baking 101 tip* Butter is another common ingredient in baking that can be replaced with vegan options. Some popular butter substitutes include:

-Vegan butter: There are several brands of vegan butter available in most grocery stores. This can be used in a 1:1 ratio with regular butter in most recipes.

-Coconut oil: This can be used in a 1:1 ratio with butter, but keep in mind that it will add a slight coconut flavor to your baked goods.

-Vegetable oil: This can be used in a 1:1 ratio with butter, but it may make your baked goods slightly less rich.

Nut butter: like peanut butter, almond butter, cashew butter can work as a spread in cakes, cookies and other baked goods.


Now that we’ve covered some ingredient substitutions, let’s move on to some recipe ideas. Here are a few vegan dessert recipes to get you started:

Vegan Chocolate Cake: This recipe calls for a combination of flour, cocoa powder, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, salt, and a few other ingredients, as well as a flax egg.

Vegan Vanilla Cupcakes: This recipe uses vegan butter, sugar, flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, soy milk, and vanilla extract.

Vegan Chocolate Chip Cookies: This recipe uses vegan butter, sugar, flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, vanilla extract, and vegan chocolate chips.

Vegan Cheesecake: This recipe uses cashews and coconut cream as the base, and a gluten-free crust made with oats, almond flour, and coconut oil.

Vegan Berry Tart: This recipe uses a gluten-free crust made with almond flour, coconut oil, and maple syrup, and a filling made with soaked cashews, coconut cream, and fresh berries.

Switching to a vegan diet can offer many benefits, including reducing your risk of heart disease, diabetes, and certain types of cancer. Eating a plant-based diet can also help with weight loss and improving overall health. Additionally, by eliminating animal products from your diet, you’ll be reducing your impact on the environment. Animal agriculture is a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions, deforestation, and water pollution.

In conclusion, this is vegan baking 101! It can be a bit of a challenge, but with the right substitutions and recipe ideas, it’s definitely possible to make delicious and beautiful desserts without the use of any animal products. Whether you’re looking for a vegan chocolate cake, vanilla cupcakes, or chocolate chip cookies, there are plenty of options available to you. Additionally, switching to a vegan diet can offer many health and environmental benefits. With a little creativity and experimentation, you’ll be baking vegan desserts like a pro in no time.

References:

“A plant-based diet has been associated with a lower risk of heart disease. A study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology found that vegans had a 75% lower risk of developing heart disease compared to non-vegans.” (1)

“A vegan diet may also be beneficial for managing diabetes. A study published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine found that vegans had a 62% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes compared to non-vegans.” (2)

“A vegan diet has also been associated with a lower risk of certain types of cancer. A study published in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association found that vegans had a 35% lower risk of developing cancer compared to non-vegans.” (3)

“A vegan diet may also help with weight loss. A study published in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association found that vegans had a lower body mass index (BMI) compared to non-vegans.” (4)

It is worth noting that these studies do not prove cause and effect relationship, and more research is needed to confirm these findings. Additionally, these studies do not take into account other lifestyle factors that may also impact health, such as physical activity and smoking.

(1) https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/11/161103141935.htm

(2) https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/what-should-you-eat/vegetarian-and-vegan-diets/

(3) https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/what-should-you-eat/vegetarian-and-vegan-diets/

(4) https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/what-should-you-eat/vegetarian-and-vegan-diets/

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